When Words Are All You’ve Got!

Communication is the primary tool of connection between people. When talking face-to-face or by Skype, information is shared in several ways – body language, tone of voice, and words.

When writing – whether for a book, an article, or a letter – all of the meaning comes through the words.

For some people, that means adding some modifiers to convey all of the meaning. They start with “Watch Dick run”, and have to add where he is running, how fast he is running, what clothes he is wearing, and other details so their readers will get the full picture.

And then, there are people like me. I love words and the nuances of meaning between them (slight variations in meaning). My first draft is usually full of words with multiple syllables that have others thinking I am talking in gobbledygook. To me, the words have an exactness of meaning. To others, it can seem to be pretentious or unintelligible because it is a vocabulary they haven’t learned or have no use for.

An example is a phrase I was thinking of using for a social media post:

                  Writing A Book Can Be Cathartic

Cathartic is an adjective related to the noun catharsis. A meaning of catharsis in psychiatry is “the discharge of pent-up emotions so as to result in the alleviation of symptoms or the permanent relief of the condition.”

Having majored in special education and working in the field of rehabilitation for years, catharsis has long been a part of my vocabulary. Recognizing that this isn’t the case for many of my friends and potential clients, I made a couple of changes in my post to:

Writing A Book Can Be Very “Cheap” Therapy

A good dictionary and thesaurus (hard copy or online) can be best friends for a writer, helping to locate those words that will be most effective in conveying the desired meaning.

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Want some help finding the best words for your writing? Give me a call at 843-593-0045 or click here to schedule an appointment.

Happy writing!

Mary Lou

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